?

Log in

Clean Eating

A Naturally Good You

Clean Eating

View

December 20th, 2010

M-Drol is the generic name for the anabolic steroid Superdrol, which is a synthetic illegal substance that will show up on numerous drug tests and also could have the potential to do major bodily harm to people who don’t use it properly. Superdrol is characterized by the nomenclature 2a,17a di methyl etiocholan 3-one, 17b-ol which also appears on the M-Drol label. M-Drol is a straight copy of the original Superdrol product from anabolic xtreme.

Superdrol (also M-Drol) might sound like an easy way to gain fast muscle, but it is low quality muscle weight that you will lose. Many guys experience the effect of gaining 20lbs of muscle..Read More at androcycle.com

December 7th, 2010

Gastric Bypass Results


Hey guys, check out my friend Adam. He had GBS back last year, and he lost over 100lbs. He used some supplements to tone up and tighten up some of the loose skin. He's got this amazing story actually.

Check it out here:
<a href="http://blog.lgsciences.com/2010/12/anadraulic-success-story>Adam's Story</a> Thanks Mondo Justin

December 23rd, 2008

HFCS-GMO

Share
My Dragon Necklace
 

            This morning I’m drinking Langer’s Cranberry Fuji Cocktail. From the get go, you can tell that something’s up with the product simply because it says “cocktail”.  When I bought it, I didn’t pay attention much. I just wanted some juice like substance and fully understood that my chances of “drinking clean” were probably out the door.

           

            Maybe I should buy a juicer?

 

            That may be going too far for me at the moment. Maybe someday.

 

            Anyway, I actually looked at the label this morning. It has tons of Vitamin C, 100% of the daily allowance, no protein, it’s 150 calories per serving. It has 4 servings, so it’s pretty much like sucking down 4 candy bars, if I drink the whole thing today, which I will. It’s juice, right? 

 

            Actually, it’s only 10% juice. The rest of it is water and sugar, cranberry juice, apple juice (Fuji) from concentrate, natural flavors, citric acid, and ascorbic acid (vitamin c).  That’s actually a pretty good list, considering what I’ve seen in “juices”.

            None of that really caught my eye though, what did was the labeling. On the front it says in a neat little box:

 

            No HFCS

            No Crystalline Fructose

            GMO Free

 

            Okay….I learned that HFCS is High Fructose Corn Syrup. The other side of the label says:

 

            Is high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) a major cause of obesity? Most nutritionists say yes. The body processes high fructose corn syrup differently than it does sugar, altering the way metabolism is regulated. As a result, the body is tricked into craving more while the liver releases more fat into the blood stream. We want more and at the same time store more fat. Langer’s Cranberry Fuji Juice Cocktail is a delicious and nutritious alternative to beverages sweetened with HFCS. Enjoy it today.

           

            Is this true? I don’t know. I haven’t really done research into it. And if it is true, I’m not sure if it’s entirely bad to  have some of it sometimes. Though, to tell you the truth. Natural sugar sounds way better and my taste buds will tell you that it tastes way better. 

            And really, I’m not supposed to have tons of sugar. I have a lot of the fake stuff, Splenda, Stevia, but if I’m going to have something other than those two, I want sugar, real sugar. At least I know it’s natural.

 

            Ummm, natural?  That brings me to the other part of the label. GMO Free. What the hell is that, I thought?  GMO stands for Genetically Modified Organisms. Sounds super creepy doesn’t it? Basically, we are talking about the genetic engineering of agriculture. The jury is out on the actual effect of genetically modified foods on the human body, though I’ve read articles that say GE (Genetic Engineering) can wreak havoc on the crops themselves.

            It has been said that a GE crop can send over spores, as veggie types are want to do, to a “natural” crop and “infect” it.  So, even if the farmer has done everything to make his/her crop natural, it might not be. 

            And I don’t really know how I feel about GE. My natural reaction is why? Why mess with nature? It’s probably bad for us. Another part of me thinks of how many civilizations were wiped out simply because they couldn’t keep up with the nutritional needs of its population and now we’re talking about a world population. However, I don’t see us sending tons of food to third world countries…

            My thoughts on the matter are truly oversimplified simply because the ramifications are beyond me. This is going to be one of those hindsight deals where future generations will call us idiots or geniuses depending on the outcome.

            In the meantime, I can do what feels right for me. I can share how I do it. Right now, I’m just trying to be more aware and finding alternatives where I can.  Here are some links for those of you who want to know more.

 

What is GMO Free?

GMO-Free Regions

CAL GE FREE

December 12th, 2008

Granola

Share
My Dragon Necklace

I’ve been eating yogurt with granola just about every morning for the last 2 weeks. It occurred to me this morning that I really don’t know what goes into the granola I buy at the store. Shouldn’t be that bad, right? After all it’s granola.

          CalorieCount.about.com gives granola 597 calories per cup and a B+ by their standards. The DailyPlate gives it about 598 per cup.  Wendy’s yogurt with granola is 250 calories. Calorie King gives and other 598 for one cup of granola and I found a page of calories listed for a bunch of granola bars at Fitbit.com.

          That’s all fine and dandy. Calorie intake is an important thing. We need it to fuel our bodies. We need a minimum not to go into starvation mode and we need less than a maximum not to start gaining weight.

          I’m no expert. I,like you, have to hit the web to find out what my appropriate caloric intake is. (The Daily Plate and other such sites have these tools.)

          But you know, I’m not just concerned with just calories anymore. I used to worry about them, fat levels, carb levels and so forth. I think those are all worthy weight loss worries, but what I really, really want to start doing now is paying attention to all of the other stuff that is in my store bought granola.

          I mean what really, really goes into it? To tell you the truth I have no idea. I just did a search and came up with nothing on Nature Valley Granola Bar ingredients, Quaker or any of the granola cereals I buy. I don’t even know what’s in the granola I pick up at Trader Joes.

          I do know one thing. Most of the things I buy at the store have more stuff in than it should. Turkey for instance, bought and made at home has 0 carbs. Look at a package of any packaged turkey meat and you will find it suddenly has them. This surprises me because it’s not like it’s been coated in some marinade. It’s suppose to be just turkey.

          Every thing we buy that isn’t in it’s natural state has the potential to carry a lot of unneeded chemicals from spoil retardants, to color enhancers, to ingredients that make things less lumpy when they naturally are. They also seem to be higher in fat, higher in sugars and higher in every thing that it doesn’t need to have to taste good. It’s just there to cater to the masses roving eye (It looks fresh, it keeps, I like the color, etc.)

          I don’t think we can exactly get away from the processed world. I know there are some things I’d rather buy than make, but if I can make it and it’s easy, why not? Why not lessen the impact of processed foods in my culinary world. Not to mention gaining the ability to control my calories and lose weight at the same time? Maybe if I start in little baby steps it won’t seem so daunting later.

          Anyway, I’m going to start with granola. It’s super easy, super cheap, and the oats are good for me. I’ve been putting it into my body every day for several days so I’m thinking it’s worth the effort to make it as healthy for me as possible.

          So, below I nabbed a recipe. It’s simple and basic. I don’t see the need to get too fancy since I’m tossing it into yogurt. I’ll probably take a stab at making my own granola bars someday, but in truth I’m not the baking type. I specialize in main courses. Hopefully this recipe will be tons tasty. I’m going to try it with Stevia first, then maybe Splenda. Though, to tell you the truth I don’t care for Splenda in food. So far, it’s what sweetens my iced tea. I’d used Stevia, but the powdered Stevia I buy clumps in cold beverages. Anyway, here is the recipe. Enjoy it and if you come up with any cool variations let us know. I'll let you know what I get into as well. J  
The RecipeCollapse )

 

 

 

The RecipeCollapse )

4 c. quick cooking rolled oats
1/2 c. Grape Nuts cereal
Granulated sugar sub. equal to 1/4 c. sugar
1 c. chopped peanuts
1/3 c. oil
1/2 c. wheat germ
1/2 c. raisins

Spread oats on ungreased baking sheet; bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes. Combine remaining ingredients except wheat germ and raisins. Bake mixture on another baking sheet for 20 minutes at 350 degrees, stirring once to brown evenly. Cool in oven. Stir oats, wheat germ, and raisins into mixture. Refrigerate in jars or plastic containers. Yield: 6 1/2 cups.

Nutritive Note: Serving size = 1/4 cup. Diabetic exchange/serving: 1 starch, 1 fat. 140 cal; 15 g. cho; 5 g. pro; 7 g. fat; 57 mg. sodium..</div>

 

December 5th, 2008

NOURISHING TRADITIONS by Sally Fallon

I found it initially at the local library, but now own a copy of my own. It's all about the various older traditions for food around the world, and why these kinds of food may be so much better for us than what we're eating today.

It's a fascinating book, full of recipes, and often stories about each kind of food in relation to our past. And why, biologically, natural foods may be better for us.
Yes, it has the evil that is the sugar, but it doesn't have all those nasty chemicals you'd find in the can frosting. So if you absolutely must, it's a better way to go. :)

SEVEN MINUTE FROSTING
Ingredients:
2 egg whites from large eggs -- 3 if not.
1 1/2 cup sugar
2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1/2 cup water
dash salt
and lastly -- 1 teaspoon vanilla

You need a double boiler for this and an electric hand mixer for this.

Start water simmering in the lower part of your double boiler, and put the top part on the counter with all ingredients but the vanilla -- Do Not Put Over Boiling Water Yet. Mix on low for 1/2 minute to blend ingredients.

Put top part over boiling water and whip on high speed for about 7 minutes, or until stiff peaks form. Remove from heat and add vanilla. Continue to whip for 2 more minutes, or until spreadable. And you're done! Very yummy and fluffy! Tastes a little bit like a marshmallow cream frosting, and will give you plenty of frosting for your cake.

 

Hello, I found one of my stevia recipes. I haven’t tried this one yet, but I will once I have adequate kitchen space. If you try it, let us know how it goes. ~F_G

 

 

Chocolate Pecan Sandies:

 

¾ Cups softened unsalted (sweet) butter

1 ounce melted unsweetened baking chocolate

¼ cup vegetable glycerine*

1 tablespoon of water

1 tablespoon of vanilla flavoring

¼ teaspoon white stevia powder

2 cups all-purpose baking mix, sifted

½ cup finely ground pecans

1 cup coarsely chopped pecans

 

  • Vegetable Glycerine is a thickener derived from coconut oil. This sweet tasting thickener is usually available in health food stores.

 

1)      Using a large mixing bowl, whisk butter until light and fluffy. Add, chocolate, glycerine, vanilla, stevia and continue to whisk until smooth.

2)      Using a wooden spoon, stir the finely ground pecans into the mixture then add the baking mix, ½ cup at a time, stirring well with each addition.

3)      Add the coarsely chopped pecans to the mixture. Knead the dough several times, form into a ball and wrap in plastic. Refrigerate dough for 3 to 4 hours.

4)      When ready, preheat the oven to 375 F. Lightly grease a cookie sheet and set aside. (Or use parchment paper.)

5)      Make 2 inch balls and place them  about 2 inches apart on the cookie sheet.  Flatten the balls slightly, bake for 15 to 20 minutes. The cookies should be golden brown.




Note: When posting recipes tag the entry: Recipe: Special Ingredient/Type of recipe: What it generally is: Title of Recipe. For example this one is tagged

Recipe: Stevia: Cookies: Chocolate Pecan Sandies.

If there was no special ingredient like Stevia or Splenda this tag could have been

Recipe: Baking: Cookies: Chocolate Pecan Sandies.

If you need help private message me. Thanks.

 

 

December 4th, 2008

Clean Eating.

Share
My Dragon Necklace

            What is clean eating anyway?  It actually is pretty much what it sounds like.  It simply means cleaning up what you eat. 

            I don’t think too many of us realize exactly what we put into our bodies and how those choices affect us.  Refined sugars, grains and tons of doctored up convenience foods puts a strain on us. For some it creates a chemical imbalance, for others skin issues, for many weight problems.

            Of course taking out “unclean” foods may not be enough for people suffering form the above mentioned issues.  Some people really are hypoglycemic and no amount of food regulation is going to help that. You may have skin issues because of your environment rather than what you eat. You may be fat simply because you eat too much and exercise too little.

            I guess what I’m saying is that most things aren’t simple. But you know, you can start ruling out what is causing problems by first eating clean. 

 

            To eat clean you must

 

a)      Eliminate refined sugar.

b)      Limit alcohol intake or eliminate it.

c)      Eat 5 to 6 meals a day.

d)     Drink lots of water. (Minimum 8 glasses for most people.)

e)      Eat foods that are as close to their natural state as possible.

f)       Make healthy choices when dining out.

g)      Cook at home, know what’s in your food.

h)      Make a commitment to yourself.

 

            For many of us, especially in the get it quick culture of the U.S. eating clean can be hard, so many of us are addicted to sugar, simple carbs and fast food. And you know, I’m not saying get rid of convenience or speed at all. I don’t think anyone who eats clean wants it to be a burden. It doesn’t have to be  if you plan ahead and think about what you are doing. Simply put, you have to set your priorities. 

            I guess that means you need to make your health a priority and think about what you really want in life and if that cheeseburger is really doing you any good. I know it’s not even though it’s tasty.

            But you know, eating clean is tasty. Eating clean doesn’t mean you’re exchanging nutrition for flavor. It means you are exchanging processed, high calorie food for a healthier, happier you. 

 

            I think that’s a good trade. Don’t you? 

 

            I won’t say the transition will be easy. Some of us are addicted to the easy access processed foods provide. What beats a drive-through window when your aching tired?  Not much, but I think you wouldn’t be so tired and chemically distraught if you were eating naturally. That’s my theory anyway and why I started this community.

            And I’m not saying you will never eat a McNugget again. You can if you want. What you put into your body is always up to you. No one is telling you to nix anything, but rather make better choices most of the time. Most of the time is a good start right? If it becomes all of the time then even better. 

 

            For starters, I’m going to give you a link to a magazine I really, really love. It came out in 2007 and I subscribe to it. It has detailed weekly menus that go into what freezes best and everything. They also don’t suck you in with headlines that don’t deliver, you’ll actually learn from it. 

            You don’t have to subscribe. On the site they have a few tidbits. It’s not as detailed as the magazine, but I think we can manage if our pocketbooks are tight. In any case, I’m going to devote more time to this community simply because I’m struggling too and I think this will help me stay on track. J

November 17th, 2008

(no subject)

Share
My Dragon Necklace
Okay, I think I'm going to start actually posting here, recipes and so forth. Sorry to be so lame about it. Will get into this soon, I promise.
Powered by LiveJournal.com